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Great Summer Weather and Growing Drought

Good Saturday bloggers,

We are getting a nice break from the extreme humidity and thunderstorms as a surface high pressure sits over the western Great Lakes.  There will be thunderstorms this weekend in the region, but they will stay across the high Plains.

KANSAS CITY SECTION:

SATURDAY: The weather will be spectacular as we will have just a few clouds along with a light east-northeast breeze.  Highs will be in the low 80s.

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SATURDAY NIGHT-SUNDAY MORNING: Lows will be in the low 60s with 50s across central/northern MO to Iowa and Wisconsin.  A large cluster of thunderstorms will be located in western Kansas.  This cluster will track southeast staying well west of KC.  We will see some high clouds from the anvils of the thunderstorms.

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SUNDAY AFTERNOON:  Highs will be in the upper 70s to low 80s with the humidity still in check as we continue under the influence of a surface high pressure in the Great Lakes.  Highs will stay in the 70s if the clouds become thicker.  Regardless, another nice day.

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When is the next chance of thunderstorms?  There will be one to two chances between Wednesday night and Saturday.  Hopefully, they will not be as ferocious as what we have been dealing with in July.  The latest GFS has the best chance of thunderstorms on Friday.

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NATIONAL/CPH (CYCLING PATTERN HYPOTHESIS) SECTION:

When we made our summer forecast we said two main things.

1. Kansas City will reach 100° for the first time in 4 years.  Well, July 21 and 22 saw highs officially at 98° which were just the fourth and fifth times that occurred in the last five years.  It did reach 100° at the Olathe new Century airport and at the National Weather Service office in Pleasant Hill, MO.  So, unofficially we were right.

2. There is a high likelihood of a drought, especially west of the Mississippi river.  Well, if you live in Kansas City it looks like a terrible forecast, but let’s take a closer look at the situation.

Here are the July rainfall totals for the KC area.  It is incredible as amounts in Johnson county range from about 10″ to 13″.  KCI has received 4.97″and 4.37″ of that occurred in the last week.  As you look a bit farther away, Lawrence was below average for the month with 3.23″ of rain.

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Let’s expand farther out again.  St. Joseph has received 1.72″ of rain while Kirksville, MO has not even received 1″.  Sedalia and Chillicothe were below average for July, but still a nice amount of rain.

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Let’s expand out one more time. Omaha, Des Moines and St. Louis have been quite dry with rainfall less than 1.50″ for the month of July.  Also, St. Louis reached 100° or higher, 7 days this month.  The highest was on July 22nd when St. Louis climbed to 108°!

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Here is the latest drought monitor.  As we look around the region, drought conditions are expanding across Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and eastern and southern Missouri.  You can clearly see the whole of non-drought conditions around Kansas City.

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When we look farther north, there is an extreme to exceptional drought across the Dakotas and Montana.

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So, when you look at the big picture, the forecast of a drought, mostly west of the Mississippi river is not too bad.  And, the worst of the drought is just one state away.

The next few days will see thunderstorms from Colorado to western Kansas and the panhandles of Oklahoma and Texas.  The next thunderstorm chances for the western Corn belt (MN, IA, MO, eastern NE, eastern KS) are in 5-7 days.  It will be interesting to see of the rain targets the small area that does not need rain, or the growing areas that do need rain.  We are headed into soybean month and the rain would be welcomed in many locations.

Have a great weekend.

Jeff

High Pressure Expands: Calm Weather

Good morning bloggers,

It’s FRIDAY!  We hope everyone is enjoying this summer. This weekend will be one of the quietest weekends of weather this year.  It has been a rather entertaining summer of weather thus far and I will enjoy this break. As July comes to an end the jet stream will be reaching its weakest strength and farthest north positions:

CPH BLEND 3 Years Lines F

This graphic above shows the Cycling Pattern Index from the past three years. This is actually a blend of three different locations. The biggest take away from looking at this graph of the cycling weather pattern is that you can see where the jet stream is weakest, right at this time of the year. The jet stream is strongest during mid-winter and weakest during mod-summer. The jet stream is caused by temperature contrast and this time of the year has the smallest difference in temperatures on average from southern Canada to northern Mexico and from northern Europe to the Mediterranean Sea.  During the winter the temperature contrasts are much larger and what is called the thermal wind is forced to be stronger.  This minimum average strength is reached during this next ten day stretch, so this should be the week that the weather is the most calm. It isn’t always that way, but it is going to behave that way this weekend.

Surface Forecast Valid 7 PM Sunday:

Look at the surface map for later this weekend. A high pressure area is forecast to expand out over northern Illinois. Most of the nation will be very calm.

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There isn’t even a marginal risk for severe weather in the day 3 outlook as you can see above.

Surface Forecast Valid Next Thursday Morning:

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This next map, above, shows the weekend surface high weakening over the southeastern United States. Another high pressure area is forecast to expand over Minnesota and the northern plains into the upper midwest.  In between these two features will be a cold front with a the next chance of thunderstorms. I described the cycling pattern in yesterdays video, and this part of the pattern is right on schedule. The take away here is that there will be few chances of thunderstorms over most of the nation in this weakest part of the weather pattern and over all we are going to have a rather quiet stretch. So, let’s enjoy the beautiful summer weather.

Have a great day. Thank you for sharing in this weather experience on the Action Weather Blog featuring Weather2020 and the cycling weather pattern.  Over the weekend I will share you some of the research we are working on to bring this technology to the world in the next year.

Gary

A Flooding Rain Event In KC This Morning

Good morning bloggers,

IMG_0115We had a flooding rain event last night and the factors that lead up to it were predictable and incredible.  Our weather team picked out a monsoon wave that formed on Monday near the California/Nevada border.  This wave clearly developed and intensified and rotated around the “heat wave creating machine” or anticyclone.  The wave tracked across the northern Rocky Mountains and then dropped southeast over Nebraska and Kansas, before tracking into western Missouri on Wednesday. This caused our second completely cloudy July day (remember July 4th) with rain off and on. Then, the influence on the front was also incredible and we picked out the developing set-up as we moved through yesterday.

The rainfall amounts have varied greatly in our viewing area. On the south side, it was already saturated from Saturday nights target. This time 6.55″ of rain was in my rain gauge as you can see in this picture.  How much rain did you receive?

Here is a video that shows the developing wave out west, and what is happening next. You will be able to see how this all is being caused by the pattern we are in this summer, the pattern that actually set up last year in October as described by my Cycling Pattern Hypothesis, that I called “the theory” 15 years ago, and you, the bloggers, named it the LRC. Maybe it will be named that some day?  Take a look at the video:

The Southwest Monsoon Influence On The Flooding Rain from Weather2020 on Vimeo.

Here is the forecast that was made by our team last night:

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As we showed yesterday, the set-up was there for a flooding event, and it happened. I am just in awe right now.  A neighbor came over just now and we looked at the golf course at the Links at Lionsgate, where the tournament is supposed to begin today, and there is no way. I couldn’t believe it, but the 3rd fairway is under water.

Things will be calming down for a few days. As described in todays video, another summer system will cycle through next week, and we have to monitor that set-up closely.  And, on the accuracy of this forecast, there has to be an understanding of how forecasting events like this works.  Remember, this type of an event does not exist before it happens. What I mean: By 3 PM we identified the features that would place KC in the target for this storm.  We then made the forecast for it to strike last night and it did!

Thank you for participating and sharing in this weather experience. Have a great Thursday! We will look ahead tomorrow.  We are also having a great discussion over on Weather2020.com if you want to join in the conversation.

Gary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evening Update: A Shift In Thinking For Tonight

Good evening bloggers,

Kansas City Weather Time-Line:

  • Now – 8 PM: One band of rain without thunder or lightning moves across. High humidity with temperatures and dew points near 78 degrees
  • 8 PM -4 AM: A few heavy thunderstorms are possible
  • 4 AM – 10 AM: Heavy thunderstorms are likely in the area with 1″ to 4″ possible

The monsoon disturbance had a rather major impact on the potential for the release of energy into severe thunderstorms, but it may not have had enough of an impact on the flooding potential. Remember it is July 26th, so there is tremendous amounts of low level moisture available for tonight’s thunderstorm event.  Will it form? Well, there are already signs in Nebraska early this evening and it seems to be targeting KC and areas to the north and east. Let’s take a look:

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These two maps show the 5 PM temperatures:

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The rain has caused this developing set up, and it is far from certain, but this looks to me as if there should be a zone of heavy thunderstorms that will be slowly moving across the area. This would allow for the potential flooding event? If it is under 2″ there will not be much flooding. We will learn a lot more soon.

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We will be monitoring this closely. The threat of severe thunderstorms is very low, but the flooding risk is a bit higher. Have a great evening.  Thunderstorms are most likely in this zone:

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Gary

Looking At Today’s Set-Up

Good morning bloggers,

Kansas City Weather Time-Line:

  • Now to 1 PM:  A chance of showers and thunderstorms with no risk of any severe weather. This chance is highest north of KC, but a few showers or thunderstorms may drift into the area later this morning
  • 1 PM – 7 PM:  The first band of rain moves by and it will heat up into the lower 90s with extreme humidity. Thunderstorms may redevelop near the Iowa and Nebraska borders by 7 or 8 PM
  • 7 PM to 1 AM:  Thunderstorms likely and possibly severe with damaging wind the main risk and some flooding possible. These will be most likely over northern Missouri, but they may shift south into KC.

An interesting summer weather pattern continues this week.  A huge thunderstorm formed just four nights ago right over Kansas City that produced power outages that have lasted all the way into this morning in a few spots. This has been a major inconvenience for thousands of households that have had no air conditioning and ruined all of their food inside of refrigerators.  Last night, at 11 PM, the the temperature was 83 degrees with a dew point of 77 degrees in Kansas City.  This 80% humidity and that dew point of 77 is a tremendous amount of fuel just laying over the area and it is one ingredient for thunderstorms tonight.  Here are the main severe weather risks for this set up:

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Factor #1:  This mornings showers and thunderstorms and extensive cloud cover

As you can see below, on this 6:30 AM enhanced water vapor satellite image, there was some rather thick cloud cover with a somewhat organized complex of showers and thunderstorms moving across Nebraska into western Iowa, northeastern Kansas and northwestern Missouri this morning:

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This is associated with a “monsoon” disturbance that came from the southwestern United States. I discussed this disturbance on the air last night. I thought it would move across before noon and then the sun would come back out and the atmosphere would destabilize again ahead of the front. These morning showers and thunderstorms will likely only increase the high dew points for this evenings chance of thunderstorms. We have to monitor this area closely as it is a factor. How long will they last and when will the sky clear ahead of the main front? This is something we will learn more about by early this afternoon.

Factor #2: The location of the front at 10 PM tonight

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This is again, just one of many solutions to where the front may be located around 10 PM tonight. The location of the “true front” is critical to where the heaviest thunderstorms are most likely going to happen. As you can see above, northern Missouri is where that little warm front is located and if this model is right on its position, then the heaviest thunderstorms would be located within 30 miles of that front and not father south as indicated by this model.  Outflow from earlier thunderstorms, however, will likely influence where this front is located, or it may provide another focusing area for the heaviest thunderstorms.

 Rainfall Forecast:

There is a good chance that a few spots could see 3 to 5 inches of rain tonight with the slow moving thunderstorms.  There is also a very good chance that a few spots will get no rain at all tonight near KC.  Just like Saturday night it will be a developing situation where we have to Nowcast well and provide an hour or two warning to the areas that have the best chance of excessive rainfall, and the potential for any wind damage.  This forecast below is from a model run from last night. Every model run that comes in is providing widely varying amounts of rain. There has been zero consistency within the models:

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The model data coming in this morning is of very little help. In this mornings surface analysis there is a front located north of Omaha and nearly stationary.  This is the true front, so it will likely be near northern Missouri and northeastern Kansas along the Iowa and Nebraska borders this evening. This is a very important feature to monitor. On Saturday there was 98 degree to 100 degree heat with dew points near 80 degrees to fuel the thunderstorms. Let’s see how much energy is developing as we move into this evening in this somewhat different set up.

Thank you for participating in this weather experience and watch 41 Action news www.kshb.com and we will keep you updated. We are also having some great discussions over on the Weather2020 blog as we have combined efforts to make this weather experience more fun for all of us weather enthusiasts.  Have a great Wednesday.

Gary

Analyzing This Next Chance Of T-Storms

Good morning bloggers,

The weather pattern is quite interesting as we move into the middle of the week. This summer has been rather fascinating as the pattern continues to cycle regularly.  The same pattern that set up last fall continues, and it is reaching its weakest strength during these next two weeks. The jet stream reaches its weakest average strength and farthest north position by early August, and then there is a very gradual strengthening of this jet stream as we move into late August and September as fall approaches. Right now, it is pure summer.  So, for us to be entertained by the weather pattern consistently all summer long is a blessing for those of us fascinated by weather. Would you agree that it has been anything but boring all summer long?

We will begin today with a look at this surface map, and I will finish with a Kansas City weather time-line.  This surface map is valid at 00z Thursday, or 7 PM central time tomorrow. Where would you place the fronts and other surface features?

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I plotted the map the way I see it, and you can see the cold fronts in blue, the warm fronts in red, and the troughs in black:

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There is a wave of energy coming out of the monsoon region of the southwest and this will interact with other features to create the conditions for strong thunderstorms with the target area of southern Iowa and possibly northern Missouri Wednesday evening and Wednesday night. In recent weeks there has been a target of northern Missouri at times, and then it shifts over the souther part of the KC metro area at other times.  In between these two mesoscale regions has been dry areas that have been missed. Parts of northern Missouri have had 10″ of rain this month. KCI Airport has had 0.60″ during July. And, the south side of the KC metro area, just 30 miles south of KCI Airport have had nearly 7 inches of rain. Who will be the target this time? It certainly seems that it is once again northern Missouri’s turn again:

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After this system moves by, high pressure will expand over the northern plains and a rather long five day stretch of days with cooler and drier air spreading out of the plains will develop.  The northeast will be the target for the stronger thunderstorms by Friday as this system moves offshore.

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This high pressure area over northwest Wisconsin, as you can see above, is going to grow, expand, and dominate the pattern for a few days.  Between now and then there is this chance of thunderstorms and we will know a lot more about the set up tomorrow, or will we? Yesterday, it was discussed in our discussion on Weather2020 about a concern over how the thunderstorm event was forecasted for Saturday nights severe weather event that caused power outages that lasted three days in some areas and downed trees. The dew points reached 80 degrees in KC and this high pooling of low level moisture/energy fueled the intensification of the thunderstorms after 9 PM. It was one of those situations that had to be forecasted at the moment, or “nowcasted”.  Knowing that there would be a severe weather event in KC could have been forecasted with a “slight chance” even an hour before, that slight chance of it becoming that strong, but I just don’t think it could have been forecasted before then. There was a Severe Thunderstorm Watch issued by the SPC, so it was being monitored closely.  And, now here we go with another chance Wednesday night. It is another big challenge.

Kansas City Weather Time-Line:

  • Today:  Sunny and hot with south winds 5-15 mph. High: 93° Heat Index:  101°
  • Tonight:  Clear and warm. Low:  73°
  • Wednesday:  Partly cloudy, hot, with increasingly high humidity.  High:  93° Heat Index: 103°
  • Wednesday Night:  Thunderstorms likely north of KC, over northern Missouri. A few may be severe with very heavy rain. The chance of thunderstorms increases farther south later Wednesday night into Thursday morning.

Have a great day and thank you for sharing in this weather experience.

Gary

Huge July Rainfall Differences

Good morning bloggers,

Rainfall has varied greatly and in rather short distances near Kansas City.  The rainfall amounts across the corn belt have also varied greatly. On this rainfall amount total list below you can see that near Kansas City the rainfall amounts have varied from 0.60″ at KCI Airport to 6.52″ in Overland Park, KS. These totals have come in three big rainfall events that have targeted the south side of the KC metro area.  And, look at the amounts in Chicago, St. Louis, Omaha, and Des Moines:

Screen Shot 2017-07-24 at 7.32.43 AM

This summers rainfall pattern has been quite fascinating.  The next couple of weeks present more rainfall challenges. Take a look at these next two rainfall forecasts from the latest GFS model, and keep in mind the models have been just horrible at predicting precipitation this entire year:

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Now, this may be interesting to some of you. Take a look at the drought monitor:

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The drought has been expanding right around KC once again as this summer weather pattern continues to cycle according to our Cycling Pattern Hypothesis.  What is going to happen this week?  There are a lot of unanswered questions and we will address them tonight on 41 Action News and in the blog tomorrow.

I just returned from my trip to Big Bear Lake. And, I did have the opportunity to hand Colin Hay my book. He put it on stage, and then walked off with it saying, “Thank you mate” as he left the stage. It was really an incredible day in my life.

Thank you for sharing in this weather experience. Let us know if you have any questions or comments. We have been having a great conversation over on the Weather2020 comments section if you want to join in.

Gary

Heat Wave Ends with a Bang!

Good Sunday bloggers,

KANSAS CITY SECTION:

I hope you did not lose power last night and if you did that it has come back on or will come back on ASAP.  We had a weak front along I-70 as a disturbance drifted east out of western Kansas,  These features interacted with about as much atmospheric juice you can have on the planet!  Temperatures were near 100° (BTW: New Century airport and Pleasant Hill reached 100°) with dew points around 80°.  This made the heat index values soar to 115°.  Note, if the dew points were in the low 70s we would have easily reached 100°-105° across the area.

Thunderstorms exploded south of the river 8 PM to 9 PM.  Here is the radar from 10 PM Saturday.  The lightning was nuts and the thunderstorms were producing 1-3″ of rain per hour along with 50-80 mph winds.

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Here are the severe reports from Saturday night.

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Rainfall was quite varied across the city and region as well and here is the radar estimated rainfall totals.  Remember, these are radar estimates and your rain gauge may read different.  You can see the heaviest rain was south of I-70 in KC and along I-70 to the east.

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When we look closer in at the rainfall totals in KC, you can see 2-5″ of rain from Gardner, KS to Prairie Village, KS.  Most of this rain came in 1-2 hours and flash flooding was becoming an issue after 9-10 days without much rain.  Crazy!

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There have been three main thunderstorm events this July, so far.  They occurred on the 4th, 13th and 22nd.  They have also mostly targeted locations south of the river and look how varied the totals are across KC.  Amounts range from 0.60″ at KCI to 6.95″ in OP.  Remember the official KC records are kept at KCI.

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So, what is next?  First, tonight a second front will move in with perhaps an isolated T-Storm, but it will be a mainly dry frontal passage and bring in a bit more comfortable air so that we will see lows in the 60s.  Lows will drop to the 50s north of I-80.

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The next chance of thunderstorms that could create havoc will be Wednesday afternoon into Thursday as a front and disturbance come in from the northwest.  This could be an interesting set up as highs may reach 105° in central Kansas as this low, cold and warm front move southeast.  The dew points will likely be 75° to 80° in our area again. There will be a ton of energy available for strong to severe thunderstorms, more wind and torrential rain in some locations.

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The latest data has the bulls eye of activity in northern Missouri, but this is not set in stone.

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NATIONAL SECTION:

The next 7-10 days will see the main anticyclone in the western USA, putting locations east of the Rockies in northwest flow.  This means temperatures this period will be at to a bit below average and there will be rain chances every 2-3 days as fronts and disturbances track in from the northwest.  This will be friendly weather to much of the corn belt as we head into soybean month, August. Rainfall totals from Iowa, Missouri to Ohio will be 1″ to 4″ with locally higher totals.

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Have a great week.

Jeff Penner

Excessive Heat and Rain

Good Saturday bloggers,

This has been an interesting week across the Plains and Midwest as there has been excessive heat and rainfall.  The pattern will cycle back to the pattern we had at the end of May and this will lead to cooler days and increased chances of rain across all of the middle of the USA.

KANSAS CITY SECTION:

We have been in an Excessive Heat warning since Wednesday and it is finally ending this evening. You can see how we are near the middle of this heat situation.

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We will make a run at 100° today before a cold front arrives tonight.  If it does not reach 100° at KCI our streak will continue even if it reaches 100° downtown as the official KC records are kept at KCI.  It will come close, if we fall short.

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As we have been writing, it has been awhile since we last reached 100°.  If we miss it today, there will be 2-4 days with chances in August, especially the first two weeks.

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Since 2013 not only has 100° been a rare occurrence, but so has temperatures 98° or higher.  We have reached 98° just 4 days, 99° for 2 days and the 100° once in 2013.  One of the four 98° was yesterday.

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Today will rise above 95° for the third consecutive day which will make this the first heat wave of 2017.  Do you know how many heat waves we have had since 2013?  The answer is not many, just three.  So, overall, we have been rather lucky the last few years.

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The heat wave will not extend to Sunday as a cold front arrives tonight.  A second front will arrive Sunday evening.  The first front arrives tonight and there will likely be scattered showers and thunderstorms.  Some locations will get missed, especially north of I-70, while locations to the south may see anywhere from a trace to 1-2″.

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The second front arrives Sunday evening and it will have little to no rain associated with its passage.  But, what it will do is take the heat down one more notch. You can see that Sunday will still see highs in the low to even mid 90s with humidity.  The air behind the second front will be a bit cooler and less humid.  So, Monday will see highs in the 80s which will feel like fall compared to what we have been dealing with the last several days.

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NATIONAL SECTION:

We are in the midst of the corn and soybean growing seasons, so rainfall and temperatures are critical to the Plains and Midwest.  Here is the latest drought monitor.  You can see the worst of the drought is located in the Dakotas and Montana where mostly Spring wheat is grown, but there is some corn as well.  The main corn belt is doing pretty well, but parts of Nebraska and Iowa are getting a bit too dry.  It would be nice to see some rain in those states.

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Here is rainfall estimated by radar during the last 7 days.  You can see that the heaviest rain has not fallen in the dry areas, although northern South Dakota and far southern North Dakota has seen about 1″ to 3″.  The dry parts of Nebraska and Iowa have been mostly missed.  Now, on the flip side there can be too much rain and this has occurred in southern Nebraska, eastern Iowa to southwest Wisconsin and northern Illinois.  It really is an odd precipitation pattern across the belt.

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Look at some of these totals from eastern Iowa to northern Illinois, which mostly fell Friday night.

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Here are some totals from southern Nebraska.  These were due to a southwest monsoon disturbance that tracked across this region just as the heat was building.  Yes, there are some amounts over 10″.

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In the Kansas City area, locations south of I-70 have been mostly dry since July 13th, so some rain tonight would be nice.

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LRC SECTION:

The pattern continues to cycle at 58.5 days and this has led to drier first halves of months and wetter second halves of months across the middle of the USA.  It looks like this trend will continue here in July as the pattern from the last 10 days of May will be cycling through and this featured lower heights east of the Rockies.  So, this week we will see lower heights and more cold fronts and disturbances across the Plains and Midwest which means more rain chances.  Unfortunately, that includes the areas that have been inundated this week.

Have a great weekend and stay cool.

Jeff Penner

Today May Be The 1,412th Straight Day Below 100°

Good morning bloggers,

The Heat Wave will become official on Saturday as we will then reach Kansas City’s third day in a row of 95º or higher.  It was 97 yesterday. It may hit 100 degrees today, but I think it will fall just short at 98 or 99, and then the best chance of breaking this almost four-year long streak will be Saturday.

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There will be frontal compression ahead of this cold front. If there is limited cloud cover, and we are forecasting mostly sunny skies, then there is a very good chance the streak will end. Then, there will likely be a few thunderstorms forming during the evening near this front. So, where it is located will be important for where the heaviest thunderstorms will be located.

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Here is the 7 day forecast that I showed on the air last night. I am on my way to California for a “bucket list” trip. I am writing up something all about this on Facebook. So, check it out. Have a great Friday.

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I am on my way to Big Bear Lake to see my favorite artist Colin Hay perform Saturday night.  I grew up in Southern California where the monsoon moisture would make it into the deserts and mountains at times during the summer.  I was sort of tormented as I would always see the cumulonimbus clouds building over the mountains and all I would ever get was an anvil spreading west out over the valleys. Oh, occasionally there would be the conditions ripe for a few thunderstorms to make it over into the coastal side where I lived in the San Fernando Valley, but that was like once every three to four years or so.  When I was 10 years old all I wanted for my birthday was ten trips to Big Bear Lake, in the San Bernadino Mountains around 8,000 feet up, to see thunderstorms. One day when I felt the conditions were right, I convinced my father and we drove the 2 1/2 hours it took to get there. The cumulonimbus clouds built up and I stared at the clouds the entire way.  There was a brief downpour, as I remember it, and then maybe after 30 minutes and a hot dog and ice-cream later, we drove home. Colin Hay, the lead singer of Men At Work, has continued to tour and he is playing at The Cave in Big Bear tomorrow night. A few weeks ago I couldn’t resist and I set up the trip. I am leaving early this morning. I doubt there will be a thunderstorm, but there may be a few cumulus clouds. Believe it or not, that was exciting when I grew up to just see a few cumulus clouds.

Have a great day. I just wanted to share, and thank you for sharing in this weather experience.

Gary